How I Lost 12.5 Pounds & Regained My Soul

Naked, as in truth, and uncensored, I share my daily quest to survive as a woman and artist, while dealing with the complications of a full life, meddling in politics, loving my children to excess, totally permanently married and on a never-ending diet. While my soul is in constant need of repair and redemption, I struggle to do the right thing. In the meantime, let's all double the love. (Love, not sex, you fool). All posts are copyrighted material.

Saturday, May 19, 2007

Odyssey Marine Exploration hit the jackpot... impressive.

Good evening, my celebrated little stinkbugs~

Are the private companies, who at their own expense, spend millions of dollars on finding 'deep sea treasure' modern day pirates or just lucky businessmen? If they find these fantastic shipwrecks and sites, can they be expected to turn everything over to the archaeologists?

This is the latest in the treasure hunt business:

Deep-ocean explorers for the company, Odyssey Marine Exploration, located more than 500,000 silver coins weighing more than 17 tons, along with hundreds of gold coins and other artifacts, in a Colonial-era shipwreck in an undisclosed location in the Atlantic Ocean, the company said in a statement.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/19/us/19treasure.html?hp

To tell you the truth, which I always do, I am rather torn. If I am going on government or private land, that is one thing, but out in the middle of the ocean? I think that is pretty fair game. Yes, it would be wonderful if once they find the sites they immediately call in the professionals to evaluate and preserve it.

On the other hand, when someone goes to their own expense to do something and there is some perceived public benefit that could be achieved if the public had sponsored the activity, why it is the individual's responsibility to then turn it all over?

Okay, so I know I am starting to sound like a republican in this post, but the public doesn't have a right to everything, just because it has some historical significance. I'm sorry, but the public isn't willing to pay for the exploration in the first place, so they really don't have the right to claim the prize.

I wish that our government would do more undersea explorations and research, but the government is spending all possible funds it can find on an illegal war.

So when Odyssey Marine Exploration, or some other company, finds these sites worth $40,000,000 or $400,000,000, they hit the jackpot. In the long run we do actually learn quite a bit about the shipwrecks, and I am sure not everything recovered on them has great monetary value, but that's the breaks.

Until as a world we value these things enough to finance ventures, we will end up with people who cultivate a sense of adventure and conquest winning the prize.

Clark County Diva




Labels:

 
SynBlog.com - Blog Directory SynBlog.com - Blog Directory
Google